Dawdle – Laid Out

This is a Thursday. Last Monday night I stubbed my toes and tilted off balance. My rib cage slammed against a hard floor. In spite of all the padding my body carries around, just had to aim for skin and bones.

Have not seen any surface bruising or swelling, but the deep pain makes itself well known. It feels similar to slamming your finger in the car door; just over a much larger area, with sharp stabbing edges and general pain that takes much longer to subside.

Google accounts repeatedly state that it will take four weeks to recover from bruised ribs, meaning that is the time it takes to be able not to fear sharp pain from sneezing or laughing. Do have to remember to take some daily deep breaths (pain or no pain) to keep all the pipes clear.

Thankfully, I have a fairly high pain threshold and have always healed quickly from previous injuries. Even in old age, my expectation is to get through this in record time. We definitely want to to be ready and able to head out for our upcoming 2017 Total Solar Eclipse camping trip, the third week of August.

Instead of feeling foolish for falling, there is recognition of my failing an important responsibility. My husband, Earl, has impaired eyesight and is legally blind, so the State (wisely) no longer gives him a driver’s license. Driving is one of the things I handle for us. Earl, in turn, takes care of many of my shortfalls. This time, very literally.

My fall “drives” home all of the reasons we escaped the suburbs and downsized to an urban apartment in our late fifties, well before normal retirement age.

We now live smack in the midst of shopping and healthcare facilities; within two blocks to a transit station. A bus stops at the doorstep of our apartment, and the light rail train takes Earl into the city to his workplace or we can continue across the city to the airport. Either of us can obtain necessities by delivery, walking, commercial drivers, bus or train. Our car often sits in the parking garage for a couple of weeks at a time.

Conversely, the fall also emphasized my “drive” to purchase our Vistabule Teardrop Trailer for more pleasure trips.

Earl lost his 20/20 vision by his early twenties. We met in our mid-fifties. Before we met, I was able to travel a good deal more than Earl. Yet, he is a person that is very open to new experiences, enjoys learning (especially about tech, science and nature) and he sees the good in people. Before I reach the age that I “can not drive”, my most heartfelt aim is to take Earl traveling to meet as many new sights, experiences, and people as possible.

For now, it is my responsibility to get healthy and ready to drive again!