Miles 1544 to 1566

The Teardrop enlivens even mundane tasks, taking us down roads we would have never tried, past sights we would have not seen otherwise and into new experiences.

This week we took Lily out of her storage unit to get overdue initial maintenance done: her bearings greased and brakes adjusted.

On the way to a neighboring small town RV sales and service business, we raced a line of identical camouflaged military vehicles loaded on a freight train.

Train on Bridge Image

Train on Bridge Passes a Stop Sign.

The train and its repetitive load stretched beyond our line of sight. We never saw the total length.

Military Vehicles on Train Image

Stretch of Train Loaded With Military Vehicles

We had to leave the Teardrop at the RV garage Thursday and Friday night, to allow flexibility for fitting our maintenance requests into their workload. The shop workers got their tours of the interior, and told us that the Vistabule Teardrop Trailer would be an attraction in their lot. They even decided to secure her inside of the garage at night.

Before we got out the door, a couple of customers asked to have a close look at Lily. So, we also gave them the complete tour before leaving.

We returned to the garage Saturday and the work was completed as planned. The buzz was that eight very interested people had noticed the Vistabule; four of them offered to buy her on the spot. (No telling if that was exaggerated, or not.) We did see that the mechanic resorted to hiding the Teardrop between two large RVs so that he could get some work done.

On the way back to Lily’s storage unit, we stopped to clean her exterior at a self-serve wash. We take our car to an automated car wash or for a rare hand detailing session, so a DIY wash was a first for us.

Washing the Teardrop Trailer Image

Washing the Vistabule Teardrop Trailer

I made the dial selections and ducked spray as Earl did the actual work. Washing Lily was as close to cleaning a cute baby elephant as I’ll ever get.

Rinsing Lily Image

Rinsing Lily

We barely needed to dry off the Teardrop. The outdoor temperature was 93 or 97 degrees, according to if you believe our car thermometer or the bank’s sign. It is not summer yet! On the way home, we cooled down with ice cream from a Dairy Queen.

Can’t wait to take the Teardrop out to get her dirty again!

Organization part 1 – Initial Steps

This is the first of a five part Doze Dine Dawdle Organization Series to share details: 1) Initial Steps 2) Car, 3) Galley, 4) Cabin, and 5) Exterior Storage Box.

Organizing storage between the Teardrop Trailer, tool box and car has been an ongoing experiment for us. This series will cover our thought (and lack of thought) processes, favorite finds, a few resource links, and inventory lists in parts 2 – 5.

Pre-Teardrop, we had organized bug-out gear with whatever was on hand. That meant stacking labeled shoe boxes into a large suitcase that was never used for its intended purpose. It was similar to a cook box, a way to keep all of the small items packed and ready to go.

Bug-Out Suitcase

Bug-Out Suitcase / Cook Box

A medium sized suitcase held set-up gear and tools for erecting a tent and arranging a campsite. Though bulky, the loaded bags were a successful solution. They could easily be shifted in or out of the car.

Suitcases

Suitcases filled with Bug-Out Gear

A lot of those basic cook box supplies were packed during our first long “shake down” trip from Georgia to Minnesota to pick-up Lily, our Vistabule Teardrop Trailer. Those items were quickly transferred from car into Lily’s storage areas during our first afternoon in a campground.

We still did not know the exact dimensions of the Vistabule’s storage spaces, but I guesstimated and made a inventory list for each drawer and shelf. Our loose plan was to place like items together, near their point of use.

Another consideration was that some cabin storage spaces were blocked when the futon was up or down in the cabin. The lower cabinets next to the air conditioner were easiest to reach at night when the bed was in position. When the sofa was up during the day, the front floor wells were more accessible.

For our second outing the focus became short local trips, and staying in place for several days. Until Earl retires, weekend get-aways will be our primary type of travel. We pared down a few of the supplies, like excess silverware and flashlights.

Yet, we also wanted to include new gear and prepped camp meals. That meant packing additional items into the car, including comfortable camp chairs and a cooler.

The food needed to stay cold on the way to the Teardrop’s storage facility. Plus, the plan for this trip was to use the Teardrop’s refrigerator freezer solely as a freezer and continue using the cooler for chilled foods. (Yes, we (I) ended up taking too much food.)

Anyway, the job of loading everything into the car was left to Earl. He was a fabulous moving-day-style packer. He laid down one of the back seats and juggled the shapes like puzzle pieces. Everything was in without blocking the use of the rearview mirror.

Camping Gear

Car Loaded With Camping Gear

At the campsite, we found ourselves repeatedly shuffling around the things left in the car, searching for whatever was needed. Part of the problem was not being able to return each item to a designated storage spot where we could find it again.

After returning from the trip, we spent a week putting our heads together to plan better organization for the car. That included reconsidering what was stored in the trailer’s cabin during transit and how to handle camp meals. We took a lot of measurements for different areas in the back of the car and tried out placing equipment in proposed spaces. Then, we purchased and labeled new storage pieces.

The Vistabule’s galley and cabin shelves and drawers were also measured in order to line them. The liners were cut and all fit, so that chore was completed. It actually went fairly quick and the numerous measurements were entered into my iPhone Notes for future reference.

Measurements

Interior Shelving and Drawer Measurements Saved To iPhone Notes

As a special mention, from the very beginning, our top online “advisor” has been Cosmo Weems. I watched his videos repeatedly as we considered ordering and outfitting our Teardrop Trailer. We even purchased some products recommended by Cosmo, for example the REI Alcove shelter and collapsible food containers.

Cosmo has a website dedicated to listing the products that are shown on his YouTube channel.  Cosmo Weems: Website Link

His videos showcase his Vistabule Teardrop Trailer, his love of the outdoors and “real” food, campsites visited, plus his thoughts about the camping products he has used.  Cosmo Weems: YouTube Channel Link

The five part Doze Dine Dawdle Organization Series will continue with four additional posts to share more details: 2) Car, 3) Galley, 4) Cabin, and 5) Exterior Storage Box.

If you are not already a follower: To receive a notice as the segments are added, hit the blue “Follow Button” at the bottom of the righthand menu column.

Vistabule Teardrop Trailer

Vistabule Teardrop Trailer

On April 27, 2017 we became owners of  Vistabule Teardrop Trailer # 126 and named her Lily.

The Minnesota Teardrop Trailer, LLC offers a factory tour and/or delivery of a Vistabule Teardrop Trailer upon request. Potential customers can also see a Vistabule at trade shows or, perhaps, gain an arranged meet-up with a willing owner.

At the time we ordered there were fewer than 100 Vistabules manufactured and we lived half way across the nation from the factory with no opportunity in our area to meet with a private owner.

After a lot of online research and contacts with the friendly helpful team, we ordered a Vistabule sight-unseen. Instead of seeking delivery, we decided it would be more fun to go to the factory to pick-up our new Vistabule Teardrop Trailer.

IMG_3271

Vistabule Brake Lights Check

Everything worked out perfectly. Whew!

During the homeward bound “shake down” trip of over 1,000 miles with Lily the Vistabule, we averaged two tours a day with curious individuals or groups at rest stops and campgrounds. It was a joy to share our enthusiasm for the design and craftsmanship of Lily, our Vistabule Teardrop Trailer.

Our family, scattered across the nation, also wondered about our travels. We, too, wanted a log of our adventures.

We had appreciated the information and inspiration gained from camping and RV travelers online and the sense of community. So, this blog came about because  we hoped to “pay it forward” and  to build connections with other camping, traveling and teardrop trailer enthusiasts.

Who knows where we will travel in the years ahead with Lily our Vistabule Teardrop Trailer, but we are sure to Doze Dine Dawdle along the way!

Wishing you health and happiness!

Colleen and Earl __April, 2017